Librarians-in-Residence – LEGISLATIVE BRANCH, Library of Congress, Washington, DC – 9 vacancies

Summary
The Library of Congress seeks early-career librarians to bring their intellectual engagement, technological savvy, and theoretical understanding of library and information science concepts to bear on practical challenges via the Librarians-in-Residence program. The program is managed by Internship and Fellowship Programs, Library Collections and Services Group.

Responsibilities
About the Librarians-in-Residence program:

The Librarians-in-Residence program offers early-career librarians the opportunity to develop their expertise and contribute to building, stewarding, or sharing the national collection. Some Librarians-in-Residence may also have the chance to create, manage, and distribute national collection metadata.

Library staff will mentor recently graduated librarians, emphasizing the application of theory to practice through hands-on work. During the six-month appointment, the Librarians-in-Residence will gain meaningful experience in at least one of the following core work areas: acquisitions and collection development; cataloging and metadata; collection preservation; reference and instruction; systems and standards; and digital management of information assets.

Librarians-in-Residence will also be expected to present information from their educational experiences to Library of Congress staff in formal or informal settings.

The service units sponsoring librarian residents are Library Services; National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled; the Law Library of Congress; the Congressional Research Service; and the U.S. Copyright Office.

Knowledge Development:

Applies knowledge of standard library methods, techniques, concepts, and principles of one or more specialty areas of librarianship to independently perform assignments in acquisitions and collection development, cataloging and metadata, collection preservation, reference and instruction, systems and standards, and digital management of information assets.

Develops knowledge of the types of materials within the Library’s collections, including how they are collected, acquired, cataloged, preserved, and shared, and the procedures governing their use. Develops and maintains personal contacts and cooperative work relationships with librarians and others in Library Services; National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled; the Law Library of Congress; the Congressional Research Service; and the U.S. Copyright Office, with colleagues in other residency programs, and with subject matter experts in the field of librarianship and information science to provide or exchange information. Presents information to groups and persons with similar understanding of the subject. Attends workshops, conferences, seminars, or meetings in librarianship and other relevant fields for professional development.

Practical Skill Application:

Utilizes standard methods, techniques, concepts, and principles to complete assignments related to one or more specialty areas of librarianship.

Catalogs various materials in an automated cataloging environment where the bibliographic characteristics of the material are relatively easy to determine and cataloging decisions are made within established standards. Searches entries in automated and manual catalogs. Assigns headings to catalog entries. Resolves routine problems promptly and independently, involving the supervisor on only the more difficult problems and recommends solutions or courses of action.

Applies standard rules, guidelines, and reference tools and established techniques and practices; and participates in formulating plans for changes and improvements to cataloging-related issues.

Provides reference and/or research services where needs are relatively easy to determine from client interviews or written requests, and the bibliographic source materials are readily accessible, i.e., can be found within the Library’s collections or a database by use of standard search procedures. Orients users and explains procedures and regulations governing use and handling of the collection’s materials. Obtains, analyzes, and organizes information using standard reference tools and established techniques and practices. Searches and creates annotated bibliographies, guides, or other knowledge products to facilitate the client finding subject specific information and resources in print and online.

Assists in the creation and maintenance of information systems to manage the Library’s collections and meet existing and foreseeable needs for reference and research support. This includes assisting with creating, managing, and distributing national collection metadata and related standards.

Monitors the condition of collection material to ensure adherence to established standards and specifications and brings deteriorating items and those with special needs to the attention of division management.

Shares responsibility for the security and safe handling of materials by adhering to the Library’s collection security policies and procedures. Ensures items are not damaged, misfiled, or lost through use.

Participates in formulating plans for collection development limited to developing factual data, and provides assistance in investigating minor collection problems, issues, or questions to recommend courses of action.

Requirements
Conditions Of Employment
No additional requirements to those listed above.

Qualifications
The program is open to students who earned or will complete their Master’s degree in library/information science from an American Library Association-accredited program after December 2018 and by June 2020. The program selectees will be expected to report to work in July 2020.

A complete application package will consist of:

Your resume
Your responses to a vacancy questionnaire, including a mandatory Candidate Statement of Interest
A legible copy of your latest college/university transcripts. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable at the time of application. Official Transcripts will be required if selected for the position. Transcripts must be issued by the college or university, and must include your name, the name of the institution, and the courses and course dates. Screenshots, Word or other text documents, and stand-alone course lists are not acceptable. Failure to submit the required legible documentation at the time of application will result in disqualification.
Names of three references: 1) the dean or director of your library/information science program, 2) a professor in your library/information science program OR a supervisor in your current job, and 3) a reference of your own choosing. References may be contacted by telephone or email and asked about the candidate’s qualifications.
Applicants will be evaluated against the knowledge, skills, and abilities required to perform the duties of the position; the better qualified candidates will be offered an opportunity for an interview in person, by telephone, or by other telecommunications means. In addition to the knowledge, skills, and abilities, the following competencies will also be addressed during the interview:
Ability to communicate in writing and orally
Ability to organize and plan work
Finalists may be required to submit a writing sample on a topic related to library and information science.
Conditions of Employment:

The applicants will indicate their preferred placement from among the service units sponsoring the Librarians-in-Residence program. See applicant questionnaire.

The service units sponsoring librarian residents are Library Services; National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled; the Law Library of Congress; the Congressional Research Service; and the U.S. Copyright Office.

About Library Services:

Library Services has primary responsibility to build, steward, make available, and assist others in using the Library of Congress’ unparalleled, multi-format and universal collection from its thirteen staffed locations (including six overseas offices). Staff acquire, catalog, process, preserve, and make accessible over 168 million collection items, while also providing reference, metadata, standards, and consultative services as appropriate to Congress, individual users, government agencies, other libraries, museums, cultural institutions and professional or community associations. Library Services provides access to staff and collections onsite via its reading rooms and online throughout the Library of Congress website at www.loc.gov.

About the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled:

Established by Congress in 1931, the National Library Service for the Blind and Print Disabled administers a national library program that provides free braille and talking book library service for people with temporary or permanent low vision, blindness, or a physical disability that prevents them from reading or holding the printed page. Through a national network of 97 cooperating libraries and 3 machine-lending agencies, NLS selects and circulates more than 19 million books, magazines, and music scores in braille or audio formats. Digital audio and ebraille materials are also available through the NLS Braille and Audio Reading Download (BARD) service and the BARD Mobile app for iOS and Android devices.

About the Law Library of Congress:

Established by an act of Congress in 1832, the Law Library serves members of Congress, the Supreme Court, other branches of the U.S. government and the global legal community. The Law Library maintains and preserves a universal collection of law for future generations. With more than 2.9 million volumes, and just under 3 million micro-format items, the Law Library contains the world’s largest collection of law books and other resources worldwide. The Law Library also provides onsite access to online databases, and guides to legal information worldwide through its website at loc.gov/law/. The Law Library performs foreign, comparative, and international law research for Congress, provides reference services and access to its collection via its reading room, and teaches legal research to congressional staff and the public.

About the Congressional Research Service:

Established by Congress in 1914, the Congressional Research Service (CRS) provides confidential, nonpartisan, and authoritative legislative research, policy analysis and information service to the United States Congress. The Service’s Knowledge Services Group (KSG) is comprised of four major sections: Acquisition & Technical Services, Content Management & Data Analytics, Knowledge Management, and Reference & GIS Services. KSG responds to congressional requests and partners with analysts and attorneys to provide authoritative and reliable information for Congress. Reference librarians author descriptive products and support CRS analysts and Congress by finding solutions for their information needs. The geographical information system (GIS) team provides geospatial analysis and mapping services, and staff also captures, organizes and manages information and data to facilitate future use.

About the U.S. Copyright Office:

The U.S. Copyright Office promotes creativity and free expression by administering the nation’s copyright laws and by providing impartial, expert advice on copyright law and policy, for the benefit of all. The Copyright Office is responsible for administering a complex and dynamic set of laws, which include registration, the recordation of title and licenses, and a number of statutory licensing provisions. The Office also acts as a conduit for the Library, providing certain works of authorship, known as copyright deposits, to the Library for its collections. In fiscal 2018, the Office forwarded more than 736,000 works, worth a net value of $47.5 million, to the Library. The Office serves as the authoritative public record of copyright ownership in the United States.

Education
The program is open to students who earned or will complete their Master’s degree in library/information science from an American Library Association-accredited program after December 2018 and by June 2020.

You must submit a legible copy of your college/university transcripts to your online application. Unofficial transcripts are acceptable at the time of application. Official transcripts will be required if selected. Failure to submit the required legible documentation at the time of application will result in disqualification of your application.

Foreign Education – Education completed outside the U.S. must be deemed equivalent to conventional/accredited U.S. education programs to be acceptable for Federal employment. If your college/university is outside the U.S., your transcripts must be accompanied by a report from a credential evaluation service that is a member of the National Association of Credential Evaluation Services (NACES)or the Association of International Credentials Evaluators (AICE). Failure to submit a foreign education evaluation report will result in disqualification of your application.

https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/PrintPreview/554219200

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